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for education. still critical and now moved to another hospital. it's midday here in london, 7:00 a.m. in washington where the sporting icon lance armstrong's reputation has suffered yet another blow at the american anti-doping agency labeled him a serial cheat. they have accused him of being at the heart of the most sophisticated doping program ever seen in the sport. it says armstrong used illegal blood and drug transfusions and led his teammates to do the same. >> the american anti-doping agency says it is beyond doubt. lance armstrong won the tour de france seven times by cheating. >> the scientific documents that are there, the financial records, the emails, it paints an undeniable web of unfortunately the deepest and the most sophisticated professionalized drug program that we've ever seen a team run. >> lance armstrong has been accused of doping before. what's new, and perhaps most damning in this report are allegations from other teammates that he bullied them into taking performance enhancing drugs. that he was in charge of the illegal operation. >> you've got a team-run, a
in education achievement and german schools. >> and 50 years of james bond, but first, here are some other stories making news. authorities in southwestern china say 18 children are dead after a landslide buried their school. triggered by days of sustained rain, the landslide also blocked a nearby river, causing flooding that has hampered rescue efforts. >> berlin is seeking to acquire the german embassy building in the czech capital, prague. thousands of east germans were told that they were free to travel to the west. a milestone on the road to german reunification. >> the greek prime minister has warned that the economic crisis in his country is threatening democracy. soaring unemployment is putting a huge strain on greek society, and right wing extremism is on the rise. samaras compared the situation to the economic chaos in germany before the rise of the nazis in the 1930's. >> a wide-ranging study centering on 27,000 german fourth graders in 1300 schools has confirmed the disturbing differences between the country's regions and social class is when it comes to educational achievement
in pakistan, after an outspoken 14-year-old was shot by the taliban for promoting education for girls. >> woodruff: and we examine new evidence that lance armstrong was at the center of a sophisticated professional doping program, including testimony from his former teammates. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> ifill: the supreme court heard arguments today in one of the most closely watched cases of the term. it marked a return to the decades-long legal debate over affirmative action. the scene outside the supreme court building made clear just how anticipated this case has been. for the first time in nearly a decade, the justices are considering whether it's constitutional for universities to use race in deciding who they admit. the suit was brought by abigail fisher-- a white, honor ro
's story. that is who she was writing for. she was writing to educate young people. educate them on the politics and social situations of the time. before the publication of "uncle tom's cabin", they were living off of calvin's salary, which was not very much. it was really after the publication of "uncle tom's cabin" and she became a famous author. the most famous author in america, if not the world. this novel brought her great fame and with it came -- some prosperity, but it would've been more if she would've negotiated a contract. she continued to write and she wrote prolifically after the publication of "uncle tom's cabin." before that, she had mostly written sketches for magazines and things like that. but this was her first big novel. after that she wrote income generating novels. she was a housewife who didn't have much of an income. but after "uncle tom's cabin" she became prosperous. she wrote a testament after the publication of "uncle tom's cabin." this is where she lived after what the novel that for her personally. the houses in the process of renovation and being a
for their college education and she's voted to increase taxes on the middle class through the ryan plan. all of this in order to keep tax breaks for multi-millionaires and tax breaks and subsidies for corporations who ship jobs overseas. we're going to reduce the deficits by bringing home our troops from afghanistan, by making sure that we create jobs right here in the district, by making sure that we decrease taxes on the middle class and small businesses, and by allowing medicare to negotiate drug prices with our pharmaceutical companies so that we can tackle the real problem, which is our health care costs and eliminate unnecessary procedures and redundant tests. >> all right, thank you, dr. ruiz. congresswoman, you have one minute. >> i don't think he understood the question, because what he just said, he's going to reduce the debt by not having so many medical tests, which, by the way, is a major part of obama care. obama care is what cut medicare by $716 billion on. let me tell you a few specific things i would do immediately to cut the debt. first of all, i would repeal obama care as
really good academic education but they've also really gotten spectacular education in living with the folks who are the real virginia today. we're increasingly diverse state and that's an important part of medication. -- education. i would hope what the supreme court would do in this case would be they would affirm that it is ok for a public institution, whether it's government body handing out contracts or student or college admitting students, that it's ok for them to try to make sure that their student body looks like the state looks. they should if at all practical use factors on race and economic disadvantage, are you the first in your family to go to college? but if you see public institutions where the numbers of students dramatically different then the state population, i think it's an indication of challenge and problem that we have to try to solve. i strongly believe the diversity of our commonwealth is the strength, diversity of our nation is a strength and we ought to see diversity in our public bodies. >> mr. allen? >> i'm in some agreement with tim's expressions
, governator, educators -- the road goes on. >> schwarzenegger is known around the world, but for other authors at the fair, it is not so easy. there are countless titles on display here, and publishers are nervous as they confront the challenge of electronic books. >> we live in the era of digital publishing. there's no question that there are more and more readers who consume literature on their ipads or e-readers. in germany, the numbers are rising as well. >> the book fair has tried to adjust. there are stands offering interactive books. one innovation -- 3d software for textbooks. software companies hope to make education more exciting with their offerings. >> there are some areas where textbooks are no longer so effective. that is where the cyberclassroom can take over. they can go into the third dimension. >> these new classrooms require active input from users. >> our correspondent is at the frankfurt book fair for us all week. how present our digital books at the fair this year? also, how much of a whole does digital technology have on the german market, would you say -- how much of a
of the opposition. and the elections that were held this summer were an education precisely for introducing under the aegis of in effect regime sponsorship, a new element of political personnel authorized to found new parties as a way of being put into the political disposition. at the same time it's a regime that doesn't hesitate to make deals even with opposition figures when it decides that that's a smart thing to do. third element is of course the stake -- the stick. it's been striking that while generally seeking to co-opt, bite off, the regime has been taking a very hard line against certain elements of a certain source of unrest, particularly those unemployed to come instead of queuing up to get credit can have actually been demonstrating, demanding jobs. nuance actually matters on that nuance depends on whether you get a handout or -- [inaudible]. the regime is not interested in really undertaking and you've got a change in economic policy that leads to significant job creation. and, therefore, it's been quite harsh with those elements of the algerian youth demanding that, and campaigning
. the headline is that racial preferences and higher education definitely came under attack today. >> let's remind everyone, ten years ago, the u.s. supreme court upheld affirmative action, less than, 2003, what has changed since then? >> this case is factually similar to the university of michigan case nine years ago. what has changed is the court, justice sandra day o'connor wrote the majority opinion nine years ago upholding diversity as a compelling interest. o'connor is no longer on the court. today the person to watch is the justice anthony kennedy, not against the idea, but hasn't found the affirmative action program that is narrowly tailored enough for him to like it. >> what about the fact that justice elana kagan, she recused herself here, there could be a tie they could decide four justices one way, four another. what happens in that case? >> in that case, the previous precedent stands. so the university of michigan case from nine years ago would continue to be the law of the land if they ended up in a 4-4 tie. >> all right, joe johns, thank you very much. u.s. supreme court to
after the break. >>> still to come, guest host ken langone will cover the economy, candidates, education. and then this morning we'll invite you to "squawk box" office hours. a chance to talk with us on facebook. andrew will host today's session. check out our facebook page. >> getting a little air brushed. >> you'll beat the record for last time you did it. >>> "squawk box" is on facebook. like the show and get update, commentary, news and much more. add us to your pages and keep us with what's happening on the show. "squawk box" on facebook and cnbc. short word that's a tall order. up your game. up the ante. and if you stumble, you get back up. up isn't easy, and we ought to know. we're in the business of up. everyday delta flies a quarter of million people while investing billions improving everything from booking to baggage claim. we're raising the bar on flying and tomorrow we will up it yet again. [ male announcer ] how do you turn an entrepreneur's dream... ♪ into a scooter that talks to the cloud? ♪ or turn 30-million artifacts... ♪ into a high-tech masterpiece? ♪ whateve
to an education. the right to sing and the right to speak out. well, now, 14-year-old malala is clinging to life on her hospital ventilator as gunmen shot her when she went to school last week. what happened to her has ignited shock and grief and outrage across pakistan and the world. cnn's reza sayah joins me. this is an amazing story that has not only impacted the people in pakistan and you see the pictures of the children with the photos and the candles and the thoughts all over the world for this girl. can you give me the latest on this condition and what the doctors are saying? >> yeah, vicr. we just got back from an interview with a top government official who is monitoring the emergency care. he says that mallala is in crit ka condition and some might say she is in critical condition for four days now, and that not good. do doctors say that is not unusual, because she was shot in the head, and she had brain surgery and swell manage the brain and swelling is always a concern after brain surgery, and swelling is serious because of the swelling in the encased skull. they say the important vi
in the tax code are not loopholes at all. tax preferences, things like a college education and retirement savings belong in the tax code even after reform happens. they were put in the code on purpose, to make a middle-class lifestyle accessible and sustainable for american families. tax reform recognized this in 1986. even as we cleared out the underbrush of loopholes, which preserved versions of the mortgage interest deduction, the charitable deduction, the state and local property tax deduction. realized that as much as we want to make the code more efficient, these provisions were two essential to middle-class households. we have to abide by the same principle today. if we seek to protect the expenditures that are most essential to the middle-class, we still hope to reduce the deficit and we will need to find alternative revenue sources. this leads to the second principle of this new model for tax reform -- the tax rate for the highest earners should probably return to clinton-era levels and stay somewhere around there. this will come as heresy to some of those on the other side who n
for. she was writing to kind of educate young people on the politics and the social situation of her time. this is middle-class i guess but before the publication of uncle tom's cabin they were living off of calvin salary which really wasn't very much. after the publication of uncle tom's cabin she became a sensation, the most famous author of america and in the world. she did a tour of great britain part no i mean this novel brought her great things and with the came considerable prosperity though there would have been more if she had negotiated a better contract with her publishers etc., etc. but she continued to write and she wrote prolifically after the publication of uncle tom's cabin. after that she had written sketches for the magazine but this was her first big novel. after that she wrote several and all of them were income generating novels. she was a housewife and didn't have much of an income but she became prosperous and her house, her real house, she might say the house that she built in hartford connecticut is basically a testament to her prosperity that came after the
. in fact, by thinking about where you want your education to lead, while you're still in school, you might find the best route leads somewhere you weren't even looking. let's get to work. [ man ] when i'm in my zone... every move i make is a statement... ♪ ...that inspires me to make my mark. ♪ [ male announcer ] the all-new lexus es 350. ♪ try this... bayer? this isn't just a headache. trust me, this is new bayer migraine. [ male announcer ] it's the power of aspirin plus more in a triple action formula to relieve your tough migraines. new bayer migraine formula. >>> now on display at the pro football hall of fame in canton, ohio. he broke johnny unitas' record. he joins us from new orleans where we should mention he is also the spokesman for paid 60 and also kinect from x-box. how do you feel about it? >> tremendous honor, very humbling. historic night. so many people are part of that. and just glad that it's over with. >> really? >> obviously the pressure mounting, going into the game. you just want to focus on doing your job and, you know, executing each play and winning the game
of education. the brown case had been argued before the court prior to warren's arrival and held over the previous term. it is impossible to know, i think, any fair estimation has to admit that it's impossible to know precisely how the court would have ruled under warren's predecessor. but notes from the conference under chief justice fred vincent, his predecessor, suggest that at best the court would have struck school segregation by a vote of 6-3 with vincent dissenting. at worst, it is possible that it might have gone 5-4 to uphold segregation. the latter would have been a catastrophe for race relations, but even a split vote striking school segregation could have been calamitous. it would have 'em boldened segregationists to find support for their institutions in the supreme court, particularly by its chief justice. the job confronting warren in his first term then was nothing less than a defining test of american race relations. as warren took over brown, i think it mattered that he came from neither north, nor south, but he was a westerner, and as such, somewhat less invested in
working at that time. blight said in an interview with the chronicle of higher education that all four and a quote argued fiercely with america's tendency toward a progressive triumphal sunny sense of history and all four his quote continues demanded americans try to see through their well practiced and comfortable myths about the civil war and develop a genuine and authentically tragic sense of history. blight's mackiel critic carol phillips said of the book and i quote it effortlessly seems together literary analysis biography and historical thinking and in a thoughtful and appreciative review in the new york review of looks andrew del benko causes suggested. one of our most noted and lauded historians, david blight is the class of 1954 professor of american history and director of the guilford lehrman. is held fellowships of the hunting library in the colman center for writers and scholars and is an elected member of the american academy of arts and sciences. light is committed to doing the work of the public historian as well answer some numerous boards of museums and historical so
government, for instance, has been making big cuts in education, health, and social welfare, but at the same time, more people are losing their jobs and do not know how to pay for their food each day. one man has found his own way of making sure he does not need to rely on others for help. >> i am technical dughtsm by profession. i am 40 years old and since easter, i have been working as a shoe shiner here. >> his work for engineering firms and four architects. he has designed web pages for publishing companies, but when he lost his most important customer at the end of the year, he faced joining the hordes of other unemployed people in spain. but he was not entitled to benefit because he had been self-employed. >> i do not want to be dependent on anyone -- not on family, not on friends. i wanted to be able to put food on the table, put a roof over my head. i came up with this idea. i am quite content with it. july and august were really difficult months. i hardly earned anything, but christmas is a while off yet. if i can buy a nugget then, that no carry on. >> unions if he can afford the t
? >> what i mean is that my education, i have been looking at old movies that i love. we speak about the reputation of the parisian, which was supposed to dress very well. i think that, you know, in france, the eccentricity -- for me, eccentricity is very chic and it is what i love. it is so much about the good taste, which paralyzed. it is still a city where everybody meets profession, sure, but it is sad that you did not seek only may be in the young people, but you do not see when people are in the rain, let's say, in society, like having the joy to address. like you have to be like the color of the street of paris. you ought not to be remarkable. it is very demanding of the people. so i said to the people, no, we have to be like everyone else. in london, it was completely different, and it still is. more distance that makes them, for me, more fascinating than the french. >> we want to take questions from the audience, but i did just want to ask you a quick question about your work in movies because that has been so extraordinarily exceptional. i think probably a lot of people --
to get girls education. the local government is offering a $104,000 award for information leading to her attackers but she does remain in critical condition. mark phillips is in london with her story. good morning. >> reporter: the latest medical bulletin on malala yousufzai's condition is she's still critical, still unconscious, and still on a ventilator and doctors removed a bullet lodged near her spine and moving her to another hospital with better critical care facilities. >> chances are for several days. fairly good chances. >> reporter: it's been two days since the taliban in pakistan tried to kill malala yousufzai. and kill her dream of equal education rights for girls. she's clinging to life. and judging from the reaction of men and women so does her dream. she was a prime target for the taliban who don't think women should have any rights. it's this kind of talk they try to silence. >> they can't stop me. i'll get my education if it's at home, school or any place. save our schools, save our pakistan. >> reporter: local pakistani officials in the swat valley where malala yousufza
already had an associate's degree and that was considered too much education. she now working at a credit union and making $30,000 a year. she was making 45,000 at leviton. these are small margins. >> i know the magazine also took a look at which industries were hiring. where should people be focusing? >> there are actually surprisingly a lot of booming jobs in america. those jobs don't pay much. but in the top ten growing jobs, we have the biggest jobs like nurses and home health care workers and personal age aides because our aging population. those jobs pay $20,000, a year, not a lot, but the fastest growing job in america. we have carpentry and people in the construction trades. those jobs through 2020 are expected to boom and the reason for that is they shed about 50% of their jobs during the housing downturn and then we have other interesting professions that are growing that you wouldn't expect. biomedical engineers that also has to do with health care and those jobs pay a lot or even veterinvet ruinary technicians, people who work as assistants to vets. >> even in a downturn, the
written sources. there are a few in the archives but they're mostly the french educated lower rank officers and they have a particular perspective. the most detailed documents were the accounts of white french officers and these accounts they wrote shortly after the campaign a couple of months or year or two after the campaign and they rode them with a very different purpose. they rode them to highlight certain soldiers who should get military medals and they also read them because the french government and the army wanted to understand what had gone wrong in 1940, why did we use this campaign so disastrously so it wasn't about human rights or not document in the massacres, but in the context of trying to explain the defeat, the officers very often gave a lot of detail on what had actually happened in the combat right after these people were taken prisoner so those are the most important sources. the soldiers in the diaries admit that they did kill africans. very few of them, but what you can see in the german source mostly the stereotypes about men eating african soldiers that mir
per employee i think would be one. education would be the second, and i think it particular on the job training has been my own experience, and innovation being the third. the more that you have the faster the economy will grow, the higher the incomes will be. another way to think about it is how much equity you have or that you at least think you have come and go willingness to take risk, put that equity at risk. and in 2007 and believe you have a lot of equity and willing to assume a lot of your income, willing to make risky investments in innovation, rather than working capital respond to growth in the economy, those things drive the economy, but after the crisis when real estate prices dropped 30% eagerly give a lot less equity, probably to have a lot less than you realize so you rein in risk-taking and economic activity contracts to just forgive a equity you have. you start saving instead of consuming to build back your equity reserve, and you start dialing down economic activity to compensate for the less equity you have. you feel less comfortable taking this. i think that's on a
and that will be to attract young kids to pursue careers and education in math and science as the space program continues. and judging by the sparkle in some of their eyes, that's very likely to happen, don. >> thank you very much. we're going to continue to follow this. also john zarrella there, live here 10:00 as it moves closer to that museum, "endeavor," live going through the streets of los angeles. >>> other news now. more trouble for lance armstrong. london's "sunday times" is considering a lawsuit against the seven-time tour de france winner. the newspaper might pursue him for fraud because of the evidence released by the u.s. anti-doping agency this week. cnn's anderson cooper spoke with a former teammate who said the team's doping program was all about lance. >> the first time i ever blood doped was with lance and it was certainly for lance, basically. you know, it was -- i blood doped myself, you know. it was done by the team, but it was done for the tour de france. so i could be a good teammate for lance armstrong. yeah, i mean, a lot of the -- you know, he wanted you to be riding at your bes
versus board of education, and he ordered the integration of the central high school in little rock and the demonstrations there which blocked the desegregation eisenhower ordered the 101st airborne division from fort campbell to little rock to enforce desegregation with a forceful message to everyone in the south that the desegregation integration was the loss of land and eisenhower was going to support it with the armed forces of the united states. what a powerful message. [applause] but finally, eisenhower did not take the lead in rgb advantages of integration as john f. kennedy and lyndon johnson to. eisenhower felt this was a difficult till -- pill to swallow and the best way to get them to do that was to stress that this was the law. this was the rule of law and he is president was going to take care of the law. it made it much easier, and easier pill for the south to swallow. [applause] >> jonathan is great to be with you today and with all the booklovers at this fabulous festival and with a very distinguished biographer, jean edward smith way think has contributed immeasurab
and paid for education and other services, it comes out of the coal field -- the coal mines and oil fields. the question becomes, is there a balance? i am a rancher by trade and i clearly understand you need economic development, but also conservation. my favorite book is holistic resource management buy out unsavory. -- by allan savory. there'll be areas where you want to protect the wildlife, but there are areas where you need to make a living. that is where sometimes the extreme environmentalists do not understand that those of us in montana need to make a living. i will stand with those counties that will try to produce the jobs for those industries. >> i did not bail wall street out and i put cops on the beat to deal with industry that you did not square with, by the way. you can say what you want, but it does not meet the test of truthfulness. when a driver everything, agriculture, oil and gas, natural resources -- we need a little bit of everything, and agriculture, oil and gas, natural resources. our recreation economy is $3 billion a year in this state to make sure we have opportu
more stars in education. let's invest in our teachers... ...so they can inspire our students. let's solve this. ♪ [ male announcer ] the exceedingly nimble, ridiculously agile, tight turning, fun to drive 2013 smart. ♪ >>> scott nations joins us from the futures pits in chicago. i watched and read a lot of commentary, scott, yesterday about that move in the averages down. and it's turning in to a little bit of a trend here. and the in an analysis was that earnings even though we knew they were going to be can disappointing or at least people said they were going to be disappointing, that we've said that so many times for the past five quarters or six quarters that people thought it was crying wolf. and eshings would not be disappointing. but now with the few that have come out so far and the china concerns, people are starting to say, you know what, there is an air pocket. it's ahead of itself based on where companies are reporting earnings and it's up there because of qe-3. >> i think you're right. i think you mentioned actually the really important name and that is cummings,
there that this isn't the way, this -- he has this other charity, athletes for hope. he tries to educate and inspire and empower them to make a difference. what an opportunity this crisis poses for him. >> it is an opportunity. and i'm sure it is a fear inspiring opportunity for him. he must think about in a couple moments, if you did do these terrible things, and he must say, wait, that would expose all my born abilities. and i would be seen to be a fraud. yes, but the truth is right around the corner. you just tell us what made you so scared to lose. from your early life experience. that you did this and you are on your way already. you know, let kids come forward that were bullied. talk about overuse of another time. he could be a very powerful spokesperson for that kind of movement. megyn: dr. keith ablow, thank you very much for being here. >> all right, megyn, take your. megyn: a small-town scandal is getting attention after a popular exercise class is exposed as a possible prostitution ring. here is looking at you, kid, a giant eyeball washes up on a florida beach. we have the latest ahead th
the citizens alive and well and educated and housed. barack obama doesn't provide that nor does this country. >> bill: you and i are in the same union do you know that after sag. it's not militant enough for you. >> no. >> bill: i think you and i should run for president and vice president. i'll be the president and you be the vice president of the union. [ laughter ] >> bill: i would send you on peace keeping missions. >> that u.n. stirred up. >> bill: i like my union but what i don't like is the municipal unions it's not the fault of the workers who have now negotiated contracts that we can't pay. that's what happened in wisconsin, that's what's happening all over the place. your state, california, bankrupt. it can't pay the pensions. >> i see the municipal workers and the teachers as being the last preservation of organized labor in this country. we borrow and borrow and borrow and borrow but now it's all coming to the end because they can't borrow any more money. the workers are going to have to take it on the chin a little bit the municipal workers. they are just going to have to. >> ju
of education. i have the right to lay. tiff right to sing. i have the right to g to market. i have the right to speak. >> an incredibly brave little girl. hire is the latest on the investigation. >> reporter: blood seats cover the seats of an old canopied pickup truck. malala yousafzai and her classmates rode together to get home from school. this is where malala was sitting, police say, when gunmen shot her in the head. malala's friend was sitting next to her when another attacker shot at the truck. he asked who's malala? i don't think anyone told him, but he recognized malala and started shooting. malala fell down, but he kept firing. that's when my frnd and i got injured. kainat is recovering from a bullet wound to the hand. the 14-year-old malala, who had a high profile blog critical of the taliban is clinging to life following major surgery. the passenger truck now part of an intense investigation to find the gunman. the pakistani government under increasing pressure to solve the case, has given conflicting accounts of the probe. the interior minister says the two gunmen have been ident
. >> reporter: the dream act. the development relief and education for alien minors. they rallied at the casade maryland multicultural center in langley park before marching to the university of maryland at college park. >> we have an argument on on the on [ indiscernible ] >> reporter: they spoke in english and spanish. [ speaking spanish ] >> reporter: the largely hispanic crowd of demonstrators shared personal stories of their fears and angst of being undocumented immigrants. >> both of my parents were deported and i found myself lost. i found myself depressed. >> reporter: a co-sponsor of the legislation insisted it's not a giveaway. >> you must first graduate from a maryland high school. okay, your parents have to pay taxes. >> reporter: they were told the dream act has university support. >> it is a misconception that getting you the opportunity to go to college will keep other folks out. as a college president, i'm telling you it ain't true. >> reporter: it was five miles to the maryland campus, which many of the students hope to one day attend. these dreamers are not just marching. it's
would not be given the kind of education to all of our students. we would prepare them to work and it would be a setback for our students and society. >> reporter: howard said diversity benefits all students but chief justice john roberts wanted to hon on you the -- know how the university would determine when it had, quote, a krill critical mass of diversity on campus. us judgeis kennedy could be a key swing vote appearing skeptical telling the texas delegation what you're saying is what counts is race above all. >> justice sodermayer said fisher's lawyer wants to, quote, gut the law. a decision in the fisher- university of texas case is not expected until spring. back to you. >> and thank you. >>>a panel of judges upheld south carolina's voter identification law requiring those who want to vote in the state to show one of five types of photo i.d. the state can't enforce the law until 2013 and federal judges ruled there is not enough time to put the law intoak. >>> and ohio getting a lot of attention this week and right notice, the buckeye state is too close to call. president
. the american people have a choice, it's their responsibility to get educated and make a choice. gerri: nick, to you. we had a screen that showed 150 million federal grant, zero batteries produced. there's other numbers as well. this ignores the property taxes, forgave annually for business taxes. it's more than just $150 million; right? >> oh, absolutely. that gets to the heart of the problem with government subsidies is that these companies, once dependent on the federal government and the taxpayers' dollar, they stay dependent on the government's dollar. that's why we see programs like the ethanol policy continually dependent on the government since 1978 and once they get stuck on this government dependence, it's hard to wean them off because they really don't understand their true cost point, and they don't have that true incentive to be competitive. gerri: they exploit the money, go after it, they know how to do it. nick, congressman, thank you for coming on tonight ill line illug this program. i hope you both come back, thank you. >> thank you. >> thank you. gerri: all right. many empl
to her life may not be over yet. >> she was attacked and shot by have an education and don'trls want girls to speak for themselves and don't want girls to become leaders. so you say men are superior drivers? yeah. then how'd i get this... [ voice of dennis ] ...safe driving bonus check? every six months without an accident, allstate sends a check. ok. [ voice of dennis ] silence. are you in good hands? megyn: well, the showdown is set to go tonight here in danville, kentucky. this is the stage where vice president biden and congressman paul ryan will go toe to toe. four years ago some said joe biden was careful not to be too aggressive in his match-up with governor sarah palin. but today there is word of a very different plan. they are saying the gloves will be off. the 2008 debate in st. louis was one of the most-watched ever for the vice presidential candidates, 70 million tv viewers tuned in. and here's a look back at some of the most memorable moments. [cheers and applause] >> nice to meet you. hey, can i call you joe? >> you sure can. >> okay, thanks. thank you, gwen. thank you.
educated. libya, their scenario, libya can come out better than tunisia and egypt. because it has a special -- special types of resources that can come together to avoid a somalia like situation be met just quickly on tunisia, and i apologize to those who heard me speak a few minutes ago before, i saw the tunisia and arab spring is split into two oversimplify. there was an older, more working class, andrea angrier spur earning based on the algerian protests, which has been since 2005. there was an urban growth gender, more middle and upper class, more socially networked, more employed from a more hopeful, more human rights oriented. it kind of push the revolution over the top. at first arab spring that didn't succeed. we did a security report last may. our main concern was disarray and i am even more concerned about that immortalization of the police force in tunisia, not laid out in the embassy attack and the recent repeats, there are some very serious problems, particularly in libya and tunisia. problems with the police that need to be addressed. but most important, is the economics come
said earlier today better, more resources than other countries and a very well-educated population system, although the libyan education system lacks in many ways as we know. but libya, their scenarios -- and i'm happy to talk about it in the q&a -- where libya comes out better than tunisia and egypt because it has those special, special types of resources that could come together to avoid a somalia-like situation. um, just quickly on tunisia, um, and i apologize to those who have heard me speak on this before, i saw the tunisia arab spring as kind of two, split in two to oversimplify. but there was a rural, male, older, more working class, more up employed, angrier arab spring based a lot on the algerian protest which has been sort of roiling since 2005, and there was an urban, both gender, younger, more middle and upper class, more socially networked, more employed, more hopeful, more human rights-oriented arab spring which kind of pushed the revolution over the top. and that's that secondary wrap spring in tunisia revolution that worked because of that. but the first one hasn't
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